Tom H. C. Anderson - Next Gen Market Research™ally financial loan payoff
what should i get my mom for christmas i have no money
payday loans without upfront fees
fifa 13 easy money cheat
door to door loans in belfast
street legal racing redline easy money
i need a loan in uk
general revenue corporation student loan
infamy payday 2
personal loan companies columbia sc
fed loan fax number
high cost loan section 32
loans secured by household goods
jackson hewitt tax service loans
small business loans in louisville ky
how to check load and go balance
strategic herding behavior in peertopeer loan auctions
bank calculator loan malaysia
can you get a jcpenney credit card with bad credit
financing a portion of a firms assets with securities bearing a fixed rate
no credit check loans without guarantor
short term money loans canada
no credit check sheds
greenwoods loans manchester
easy quick first time payday loan
cattle loans
what are mortgage lenders looking for in bank statements
i appreciate your assistance in advance
pulsar 180 bike loan
car lots that finance bad credit in kansas city
need cash urgently in delhi
pokemon emerald visual boy advance codes
i need cash now but i have no bank account
abbey life home loans
how many loans does the average person have
how to get rid of personal loan debt
is plain green loans legal in ohio
6000 personal loan bad credit australia
s line on bank statement
personal loans india bajajfinservlending
best way to finance a used car loan
i need a loan yahoo.com
credit union loans calculator mullingar
washington mutual bank reo properties
child tax credit xmas paydays
check advance paintsville ky
4000 dollar loan
car repair loans in maryland
alternative home loan options
the 5 cs of loans
payday the heist 2 player split screen
online korean course for college credit
bike loan philippines
bank overdraft on cash flow statement
can i get a payday loan with someone elses bank account
money today september 2014 download
how to get easy money in apb reloaded
student loans cancelled at 50
credit approval letter sample
can a payday loan take you to court in texas
names of private loan company in usa
how do i get a cash advance on my old navy visa
very fast way to make money
money network adp total pay
buy zippo lighter online cash on delivery
cash express union city tn
sample format of personal guarantee for loan
short term loan melbourne
how to get loads of money on hill climb racing
loans from venture capital
instant cash payout
military paydays usaa 2014
compare personal loan dubai
24 month loans
washington federal auto loans
personal loan with bad credit no bank account
stop payment on check advance
houses for rent in maryland with no credit check
loan bank yang senang lulus
can you western union money to a bank account
home loan banks in kolkata
icici bank credit card instant emi
car loan in sydney
loan shark craigslist
how to build a payday loan website
what questions do banks ask for loan
capital one dental loan
best books on kindle lenders library
definition for short term loan
is dell financing easy to get
is installmentloans org legit
account now bank name and address
bad credit high income personal loan
no credit check car dealers in fredericksburg va
student emergency loans with bad credit
5 year 30000 loan
iphone 5 cash back deals india
loan shark on good times
monumental life insurance loan form
injustice how to get fast money

More Than Market Research - Gain The Information Advantage

Tom H. C. Anderson - Next Gen Market Research™ header image 6

Rethinking Rethink

March 28th, 2012 · 3 Comments

Random thoughts from this year’s ARF Re:think 2012

The Advertising Research Foundation’s annual Rethink conference just ended. As the biggest annual research event here in the north east I always enjoy catching up there with both new and old colleagues.

Buzzworthy Presentations

Two of Monday’s presentations seemed to catch a lot of attention (and offend some). One of these which attendees were still buzzing about yesterday was a presentation by Karen Nelson-Field of Ehrenberg-Bass Institute for Marketing Science. She challenged researchers on the importance and uniqueness of social media and asked whether the current investments really have been worthwhile.

Facebook Likes for instance certainly seem to have little correlation with engagement or increased sales, and even those among us who are more active on Facebook, even with the micro targeting possible, find it difficult to remember a compelling ad there. Few many of us return ever to a brand site.

Personally I think the problem lies not in the value of social media as a marketing tool, but more in how marketers are approaching it. More on this later.

The second source of buzz carried over from Monday was a panel entitled “Getting Ahead of Change” in which CEO’s of Nielsen, Millward Brown, GfK, Kantar, and Ipsos tried to dissuade the audience from the common belief that research innovation isn’t coming from them directly, but only from startups which later are bought up by the “big guys”.

While I’m obviously biased in this area having spent many years with some of the larger firms before starting Anderson Analytics (OdinText), most of those who attended seemed to continue to share my bias after the presentation. While the ‘big guys’ have traditionally had some advantage in scaling certain metrics, they certainly don’t seem too innovative and most of their acquisitions eventually just end up competing against each other ( It mainly serves to decrease margins and is more of a case of 1 + 1 = 1/2). I would also argue that with the rise of API’s and web data becoming equally available to all, this one benefit of scale will also become less of an advantage.

Digital Research and Tracking

I made a point to attend two consecutive Unilever case studies focused on digital research yesterday. The first was a collaboration between TNS’s Cymfony and Compete.com, and attempted to draw insights between what people say online and what they actually do. An interesting idea for sure, but I was rather disappointed that the data had been analyzed in isolation. The research would have been far more compelling had the data sets been linked, something that we’ve looked at in the recent past and I l know is already possible, privacy issues aide.

In the study TNS Cymfony had provided social media comment analysis, I’m assuming from the standard mix of primarily Twitter and Blog data. Compete had analyzed website traffic data. Unilever’s Bob Bowan commented that “engagement” (comments), “solutions” (sites where information was consumed), and “purchase” were occurring in completely separate online locations. The consolidation of which obviously represent a great opportunity for those who can do a better job creating credible and engaging content sites within their category. Unfortunately, as of today I rarely see this happening in practice.

At the GRIT party later that evening my friend Larry Friedman, CRO at TNS, said it well “Most are just focusing on the ‘Media’ component of ‘Social Media’, they are missing the ‘social’”. I do think brands can get there, but it will take some time to change the corporate mindset. Companies must be willing to yield more control to the customer for it to happen.

The second case study was presented by Pattii Wakeling of Unilever and John Burbank, CEO of Nielsen Online. I noticed Facebook was in attendance as well, and it’s nice to see that one social network is interested in at least the advertising related side of the market research industry (Google was also present).

Nielsen, through their relationship with Facebook, has been able to leverage users Facebook cookies allowing for a much broader level of tracking ever previously possible. This is exciting as it allows for research far more representative than traditional panel related methodologies.

By leveraging other options available today I believe it’s possible to get similar insights beyond facebook, but doing it via facebook is obviously an attractive option for Nielsen as the privacy concerns are then in facebook’s court.

Discussing the issue later with Mark Michelson of the newly formed Mobile Marketing Research Association (MMRA), we both agreed that the old research privacy standards that most of us have followed for years are becoming less and less relevant. If consumers know we are tracking them online, then whether or not our clients get user level survey information also becomes less important.

Scope of Social Listening

A lighter presentation I attended was one by Netbase in which they had looked for online comments using search topic criteria of comments containing “I like/need…” in social media, and had then compared men vs. women. In regard to food/snack mentions for instance they had found that the most popular comment by women was “chocolate” while men were most likely to mention “bacon”.

These social listening results were compared to short open end comments from a survey that seemed to find relatively similar answers. Both genders for instance were likely to say “money”, and women were more likely to say “a nice house”. These were extremely similar to data we’ve seen in our own annual research among college students where we conduct an icebreaking exercise to encourage fast top-of-mind unstructured responses.

Audience comments afterwards were rather interesting. One researcher commented “these seem to be such as basic level of needs. Is the discussion really all driven by brands online? There seems to be very little thinking… Did you just look at Twitter or also blogs with deeper thinking?”

I think this is a common issue and reflective of the problem inherent with casting a wide net in social media listening rather than more carefully scoping out a research problem and identifying specific sites for a deeper dive. The latter which I have always found more actionable for clients.

The problem lies in the fact that most social media listening data constitute RSS data from just a few large sources such as Twitter and Wordpress. If a client knows of a specific site of interest where an important customer group is active it usually requires custom scraping and text analysis.

Subsequent discussion on the topic focused on the value of visceral answers in both social media and survey research. I think everything has its place, but in my opinion the main lesson as usual is that the more specific we get in study design, whether survey or social media, the more actionable the insights will be.

@TomHCAnderson
@OdinText

[Post to Twitter] 

Tags: Advertising · Advertising Research Foundation · Anderson Analytics · Conferences · Market Research · Marketing research · Rethink · Text Analytics · arf · blog mining · facebook · innovation · social-media analytics

3 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Jasper Snyder // Mar 28, 2012 at 3:05 pm

    Hi Tom.

    Interesting post. It’s possible to see this all as a function of social media analysis - I’m deliberately using a somewhat amorphous term - being regarded as a silver bullet to hit targets in customer service, sales lead generation, market research, campaign optimization etc..

    As you suggest, with a maturing market we’ll start to see more specificity in terms of study design (and commensurately higher expectations in terms of sophistication of supplier methodology). I posted something this morning which goes into a little detail on that subject, maybe of interest: http://blog.converseon.com/2012/03/28/how-to-use-social-media-for-market-research

    Jasper

  • 2 Cathy Harrison // Mar 30, 2012 at 9:51 am

    Interesting read Tom - thanks! I agree with your comment about the need to dig into specific sites to answer your client’s research questions. Although it’s useful to use social media listening tools to see the range of topics being discussed, for actionable insights, it usually comes down to an in-depth qualitative analysis of conversations on forums.

  • 3 Tom H C Anderson // Mar 31, 2012 at 11:12 am

    Thank Cathy,

    Perhaps. Personally I much prefer in-depth quantitative analysis of that discussion ;)

    Perhaps that’s another reason “Text Analytics” has overtaken “Text Mining” in terms of overall use as the general term to describe using software for analysis of unstructured data. It’s broader than text mining, but I miss text mining and feel it is more accurate about what can really be offered further down the value chain of unstructured data analysis.

Leave a Comment