Tom H. C. Anderson - Next Gen Market Research™how to get bank loan for business in india
rcs home loans cape town
consolidated loans in laredo tx
private lenders unsecured personal loans
apply for loan standard bank
finance companies for cars
arizona loans online
cash genie forum
why are these technological advances important to bank customers
murfreesboro payday cash advance
pay off pay day loan
embrace home loans maitland fl
montana wood products revolving loan fund
payday money now
good money apps
auto loans for no credit no cosigner
online real payday loan
arvest bank mission and crossover
how to get gaia money fast
quick cash loans online philippines
yacht loans rates
used car loan rates colorado
loans to get out of deb
how long does it take to pay back 40000 in student loans
usda guaranteed loan minimum credit score
how to get fast cash on sims
pnc bank personal loan online application
best small loan australia
best deals on home loans
where to get free money today
knicks heat money line
tech cu home loans
can you do a payday loan without a check
what is the best way to borrow money for a business
loan company gallatin tn
financial advisor for student loan debt
how to get your credit score
bank of america motorhome loan
hdfc home loan application status
ace cash advance spokane valley wa
southern loans of henderson nc
how to make some quick money fast
how to get easy money on pokemon white
du refi plus loan lookup
logitech harmony one z wave
rk cash advance gem v
lend america home loans
payday lenders in virginia
cash call utah
quicken loans no cost refi
registrar of moneylenders gujarat
student loan forgiveness direct loan program
interest free cash loans
loans for expatriates in uae
can you have 2 payday loans at onc
think cash payday loans
month to month financial loans
title loans belmont ave youngstown ohio
virgin money bank jobs
educational loans sbh
login to charter one online banking
find a loan website
education loan in india tax exemption
petty cash handover form
songs like the ones in project x
dollar loan center cash advances
loan document
afc energy loans
2000 cash loan now
loans to pay off iva
do 0 down loans still exist
where can i get a loan with no credit
how to earn a quick 50 dollars
short term guarantor loans
mortgage loan originator license nj
us fast start finance report
chennai express advance booking till now
loan type 51 arm
general loan pizza
cant get a loan for a house
our money is fake our debt is fake
payday loans yorktown va
crisis loan england phone number
how to know if you qualify for a personal loan
help with money asap
how much income do i need for a personal loan
cpf loan calculator
spells for instant money for free
student loans company australia
peoria il payday loans
islamic loans
idbi bank online loan statement
1st capital title loans
loans in natrona heights
how to wire money bank to bank
check credit score no bank account
quick online unsecured loans
personal loans interest rates
cash store no credit check
auto loan rates in florida

More Than Market Research - Gain The Information Advantage

Tom H. C. Anderson - Next Gen Market Research™ header image 6

Marketing Guru Guy Kawasaki and Tom H. C. Anderson talk about Web 2.0, New Marketing, Innovation, Market Research – Anderson Analytics Round Table Discussion #2

March 17th, 2008 · 9 Comments

Marketing Guru Guy Kawasaki and Tom H. C. Anderson talk about Web 2.0, New Marketing, Innovation, Market Research
[Anderson Analytics Round Table Discussion #2]

Guy Kawasaki Anderson Analytics 

Guy Kawasaki
Marketing Guru

In an effort to bring highlight innovations, methodological trends, and current thoughts in market research, Anderson Analytics has started an ongoing “round-table discussion” series. The second of the series is an interview with marketing guru, Guy Kawasaki. Perhaps best known as Chief Evangelist at Apple, among his many other accomplishments, Guy is managing director of the start-up venture firm Garage Technology Ventures and columnist for Entrepreneur Magazine, and author of eight books, including The Art of the Start, Rules for Revolutionaries, How to Drive Your Competition Crazy, Selling the Dream, and The Macintosh Way. He has recently launched the rumor reporting website Truemors.com and actively contributes his experience and insight on technology and life through his blog, How to Change the World: A practical blog for impractical people.

Guy Kawasaki took time out from his busy schedule to discuss market strategy, technological innovation in marketing, and market research with Tom Anderson. They started the discussion on the state of the internet, how the web is being used, and how market research might capitalize on web advancements.

Tom H. C. Anderson: Given the evolution of the internet into Web 2.0, what do you think Web 3.0 will be like?

Guy Kawasaki: I hate these monikers. I don’t even know what Web 2.0 is exactly. I think Web 1.0 was enabling technology. Web 2.0 was businesses using technology but lacking business models. Perhaps Web 3.0 is lacking technology and business models. My underlying point is that people don’t go on the Internet looking for “Web X.0” products and services. They are looking for fun, companionship, inspiration, money, whatever, but they don’t define themselves in terms of the terminology that the industry uses.

Tom H. C. Anderson: Market researchers are gradually paying more attention to the information presented in blogs & discussion boards, however, how representative of the overall market do you think the opinions of bloggers are?

Guy Kawasaki: They are hardly representative. The blogosphere is about 250,000 boys and men still living with their mothers and have dead cats in their refrigerators. If a blogger says your product is crap, it doesn’t mean it will fail. If a blogger says it’s great, it doesn’t mean it will succeed. I am fundamentally not a believer that A-list opinion leaders lead the masses to products and should therefore be the focus of product introductions. Best case, I think bloggers’ reports on what’s hot but don’t make things hot.

Tom and Guy also discussed new innovations in market research, although Guy’s views about the field of market research were insightful, if not surprising.

Tom H. C. Anderson: Do you think market research is doing a good enough job in keeping up with the changes in product communication due to the Internet?

Guy Kawasaki: I hate to tell you, but I’m not a big believer I market research either. I believe you take your inspiration and throw it out there. If it sticks, praise God. If it doesn’t, you can listen to research and try to fix, and then you throw it out there again. But I don’t believe a focus group has ever created a revolution.

Tom H. C. Anderson: Do you have any thoughts on the value of text analytics to gain insights online, or even link analysis to understand Social Network Services? Are these technologies being embraced as a way to better understand customers at the executive level?

Guy Kawasaki: Text analytics and link analysis could lead to much customer understanding. However, there are so many ways to lie with site analytics—and you don’t even have to lie: you could simply not know what stats really represent—that it’s a crapshoot right now. For example, suppose that you are told that one million people watched your online video. Great, huh? But do you really know how many finished watching it? Do you know where they dropped off?

Tom H. C. Anderson: At tech companies, what is the right mix between allowing engineers to develop what they want VS trying to anticipate what customers will want by utilizing market research/trend spotting etc.? I think Nokia is a good example of how a lot of market share was lost due to engineers deciding what the product should look like, while consumer signals such as a desire for flip/clam-shell phones and a clear color display became more and more important to US customers and eventually spread globally leaving Nokia behind. How can this type of situation be avoided?

Guy Kawasaki: The separation of engineering and marketing is artificial. It presumes that engineers build feature-laden crap that no one cares about but engineers. Maybe mediocre engineers do this. Great engineers create with a customer in mind. Fantastic engineers create with themselves in mind as the customer.

Every Nokia engineer should give their prototypes to their mothers, fathers, and kids. That would fix everything. The user interface of almost every phone is unintelligible. Anyone could have done an iPhone—it’s not like Apple has a monopoly on design.

Guy and Tom also discussed market strategy, in which they shared their philosophy of marketing and the role of customer input.

Tom H. C. Anderson: On the marketing strategy side you’ve talked about having to be customer focused, in order to create the revolutionary product, you have to know customers better than they know themselves. How is this done effectively?

Guy Kawasaki: I believe in “if you build it, they will come.” Thus, you take engineers and let them build what they think they themselves would like to use. Now, if your engineers are crappy, then you’ll end up with crap. But if they are great, you can change the world. Note: I did not say you should ask customers what they want in a revolutionary product. This would ensure mediocrity at best and crap at worst.

Having said this, once you ship the revolution, then you do need to listen to customers as they tell you how to evolve the product. But they cannot tell you how to create version 1.0

Tom H. C. Anderson: What are your views on effective customer segmentation strategies? What is an effective segmentation strategy, if any, that you have come across?

Guy Kawasaki: The most effective customer segmentation that I’ve found is that you build the product that you would use—ie, a segment of one. Then you hope and pray that there are more people like you.

[Post to Twitter] 

Tags: Branding · Business Guru · Guy Kawasaki · Interview · Marketing · Strategy · Tom H. C. Anderson

9 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Market Penetration of Social Media - Who Uses Twitter? // Jan 13, 2009 at 3:28 pm

    [...] a side note, ever since I interviewed Guy on this blog last year I’ve tried to stay in touch with him and what he has been doing [...]

  • 2 Why you should go and observe someone else’s work? « The Comparative Advantage // Jun 28, 2009 at 6:11 am

    [...] In the words of Guy Kawasaki: [...]

  • 3 2010 Marketing Trends Study Results // Mar 1, 2010 at 6:17 pm

    [...] I’ve interviewed both David and Guy on this blog previously, I look forward to learning more about Chris and Clayton and perhaps having [...]

  • 4 Why Don’t More Businesses Follow Back on Twitter? // May 24, 2010 at 9:11 am

    [...] to me to see few businesses following the follow back etiquette on Twitter that Guy Kawasaki has advocated. A missed opportunity in increasing # of followers an to be courteous to your [...]

  • 5 Market Researchers Should Become Refrigerator Manufacturers // Aug 21, 2010 at 11:30 am

    [...] as Guy Kawasaki recently pointed out, no Ice Cutters made the change between Ice Cutting and Ice houses. Similarly [...]

  • 6 New Market Research Interview // Jan 8, 2011 at 9:01 am

    [...] by new and upcoming Next Gen Research blogger Sean Copeland, and then by becoming the #1 blog on Guy Kawasaki’s All-Top Market [...]

  • 7 MR Heretic Explained // Jan 28, 2011 at 10:12 am

    [...] Twitter, Facebook, The Economist, Science, New Scientist, Advertising Age, Mitch Joel, Clay Shirky, Guy Kawasaki, O’Reilly radar, Kevin Kelly, and whoever else has something interesting to say on any given [...]

  • 8 Social Media Influence // Apr 21, 2011 at 12:52 pm

    [...] I first got into social media, specifically when I was trying to understand Twitter, Guy Kawasaki was an inspiration to me as well. He gave a lot of helpful tips on his blog. However, as with all [...]

  • 9 The Real Social Media Influencers // Feb 8, 2012 at 1:08 pm

    [...] of folks who are really influential about social marketing (on par with) Scott Monty of Ford or Guy Kawasaki. So I don’t leave anyone very important out, if there is anyone who you know/follow who is [...]

Leave a Comment